Call our hotline at

203-524-2189 for assistance.


Please do not e-mail us for any injured or orphaned wildlife as it may be hours before we recieve it.

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WILDLIFE SPECIES IN OUR AREA IS EXTENSIVE.  LISTED BELOW IS ONLY THE MOST COMMON SITUATIONS.  REGARDLESS OF WHAT WILDLIFE YOU HAVE FOUND YOU SHOULD CALL US PROMPTLY SO THAT WE BETTER ASSIT YOU.


Kidnapping is when a baby wildlife is taken away from its natural mother.  This usually occurs when a finder with good intentions thinks they are helping the animal when in fact,  intervening is not necessary and the babies are doing just fine.  This is very common with fawns and baby bunnies.





BUNNIES AND BUNNY NESTS


If you find a Bunny or nest - Rabbits can have anywhere from 2-8 babies, sometimes up to 10 called kits.  The nest is usually a shallow divot in the ground lined with grass and the mother’s fur.  If you come across a nest don’t be surprised if you DON’T see the mother.  Wild rabbits protect their young by staying away.  Babies are born without a scent so that they are not easily detected by predators.  The mother only comes back to the nest to feed the kits when she feels it is safe to do so.  This is usually at dawn and dusk however, she may be spotted during the day as well.  When she feeds she will quickly uncover the nest and lay across it giving the kits a chance to nurse then she quickly covers the nest back up and leaves.


Common problems: domestic pet attacks, lawn mowing accidents, kidnappings and flooding.


If you feel the nest may have been abandoned you can do whats called a string test to
help confirm your feelings.  Make an X over the entire nest using a piece of string, yarn or two thin twigs.  If the mother is coming back the X will be disturbed within a 12-24 hour period.  If the X is still intact and in the same position when you left it, this would be a good time to seek help.  Another cause for concern is if the nest looks like it has been disturbed, babies may be on the out skirts of the nest and not inside it, they look very skinny, wounds are noticed or there are dead bunnies in or around the nest.


Baby bunnies that are able to leave the nest are commonly spotted.  They are able to do so at about 2- 3 weeks of age.
They appear very small and friendly but are in fact pretty self sufficient and in most cases will let you walk right up to them.  These bunnies are in a learning stage and have not yet developed their “fight or flight” instincts and will instead freeze as opposed to running.  This can cause serious concern for some finders but in fact the bunny/s are just fine.  However if you notice any of these signs there may be a problem.  wounds, dead bunnies in or around the area, flies on or around the bunny/s  or  the bunny/s appear skinny and/or week there may be reason for concern and you should call us.


If necessary to rescue the bunnies. You can do this by wearing gloves, or using a towel, broom or something that won’t cause injury and gently nudge the babies into a secure covered box to prevent them from escaping.  You can poke small holes in the box for ventilation and it should be lined with a soft cloth such as a T-shirt, pillowcase or towel to help keep them warm.  Doing this will also give them a sense of security and allow them to hide between the layers if they choose. Do not use anything with loose strings or holes as this can cause loss of circulation or strangulation.  Keep them in a warm and quiet area away from children, pets and loud noises as this can cause additional stress and in some cases death. Call us immediately and do not give food or water.  This can cause drowning, aspiration, choking or stomach upset.







IF YOU FIND A BABY DEER (FAWN)


Deer usually have 1-2 babies called fawns.  The Mother called a doe leaves her fawn/s where she thinks it will be safe in order to protect them. Fawns instinctively know to stay very still and quiet until the mother returns.  A doe always knows where her babies are and can sometimes be spotted in the distance.  Fawns are also born without a scent, this protects them from being found by other animals or predators.  Since the fawn
is left alone for most of the time in its first 2 weeks people tend to think it is orphaned and needs help. 


Common problems: Mother was hit by a car, fawn was attacked by a dog or coyote, human kidnappings.


If you are concerned, here are a few tips to see if a fawn is actually in need of help.  A healthy and cared for baby fawn should be sitting in an upright position, meaning its head should not be lying on the ground, it should also be quiet.  The fawn will more than likely not run away from you if approached however, do not let this alarm you, it is normal.  Do not get too close or touch the fawn as the mother is very sensitive to scents left behind and may then decide to abandon the baby if she smells a human scent.



Some reasons to be concerned would be if the fawn is lying on its side with its head on the ground, or it is crying, if noticeable wounds or blood are spotted, it has been there for over 24 hours or if you noticed a dead adult deer in the area.   If this is the case then you should call us immediately.





IF YOU FIND A BABY SQUIRREL OR RACCOON


Raccoon and squirrels can have litters of 2-6 babies.   Both squirrels and raccoons are great mothers and take very good care of their young.  If the mother is around and notices a baby out of the nest she will usually come get it and bring it back to the nesting site. So finding one of these baby animals on the ground and alone is reason enough for concern and you should call us.

Common problems: domestic pets, tree removals, storms, high winds, trapping a mother and removing her or, in some cases the babies just crawl out of the nest and fall to the ground.  This can be because of the nest becoming to small or something has happened to the mother causing them to become hungry and panicked.


If necessary to rescue the anima
l/s. You can do this by wearing gloves, or using a towel, broom or something that won’t cause injury and gently nudge the babies into a secure covered box to prevent them from escaping.  You can poke small holes in the box for ventilation and it should be lined with a soft cloth such as a T-shirt, pillowcase or towel to help keep them warm.  Doing this will also give them a sense of security and allow them to hide between the layers if they choose. Do not use anything with loose strings or holes as this can cause loss of circulation or strangulation.  Keep them in a warm and quiet area away from children, pets and loud noises as this can cause additional stress and in some cases death. Call us immediately and do not give food or water.  This can cause drowning, aspiration, choking or stomach upset.




IF YOU FIND A BABY BIRD



                                                                             

                                                                               Baby birds found on the ground that are fully feathered and able to hop are called fledglings. Fledglings learn how to fly from the ground up w
hich can take a few days to accomplish.  If you think you have spotted a fledgling look and see if you notice the mother in the area.  If so,  she will continue to care for her young while they are on the the ground learning how to fly and will continue to care for them even after they take flight.


Bird flew into the window - This commonly happens and the bird will become stunned and/or appear to be injured.  If this happens follow the same guidelines below but wait about 30 minutes and see if the bird becomes alert on its own.  If so and the bird appears to be ok you can release it in the area that you found it (This usually happens).  If not them call us the bird may have suffered some injuries.


Common problems: Domestic pets, kidnappings, storms, pesticide spraying, flying into window.



If necessary to rescue the bird/s you can do this by wearing gloves, or
using a towel, broom or something that won’t cause injury and gently nudge the babies into a secure covered box to prevent them from escaping.  You can poke small holes in the box for ventilation and it should be lined with a soft cloth such as a T-shirt, pillowcase or towel to help keep them warm.  Doing this will also give them a sense of security and allow them to hide between the layers if they choose. Do not use anything with loose strings or holes as this can cause loss of circulation or strangulation.  Keep them in a warm and quiet area away from children, pets and loud noises as this can cause additional stress and in some cases death. Call us immediately and do not give food or water.  This can cause drowning, aspiration, choking or stomach upset.
 

FOUND A WILDLIFE?

Tailor’s Wildlife Rescue Group Inc - P.O. Box 8028 - Stamford, Ct 06905 - 203-524-2189

Email - TailorsWildlife@Gmail.com              

501 (C)(3) Non Profit Organization

100% Volunteer Based

Founded 2009

CT DEEP Full list of Wildlife Rehabilitators in CT by Species & Town

Click Here


DEEP Hotline # 1-860-424-3011

Weeknights & Weekends

1-860-424-3333

Email laurie.fortin@ct.gov

Some Helpful Tips

If possible PLEASE do not leave a injured or orphaned wildlife just laying on the ground or left to wonder about on its own.  Follow the guidelines below.


Eyes closed baby found on the ground more then likely needs your help.  Baby eyes closed mammals can not regulate their own body temperature to stay warm, eat on their own, or see.  Even if the weather seems warm and it is a nice day, leaving an eyes closed baby in the sun can cause severe dehydration and make them susceptible to fly eggs and/or predators. Which will further compromise or kill that mammal.


Eyes open small mammals looking desperate and/or just sitting there. Probably needs help and may not be of age to fend for themselves or find food sources and are still dependent on their parent/s for survival. 




PLEASE NO FOOD OR WATER

Please DO NOT give any food or water as this can seriously compromise the wildlife further if there is an obstruction, the animal is cold, or liquids are given improperly which can cause aspiration and possible death. 


HOW TO CONTAIN THE WILDLIFE

Injured or compromised wildlife may have a tendency to bite when feeling scared or threatened.  Always take the proper precaution when handling these animals.


If possible using gloves and/or a towel or T-shirt and with personal safety in mind place the wildlife in a secure well ventilated container.  You can line the container using an old T-shirt or other soft material as bedding.  Keep the animal in a quite place away from children and pets.  This is important: Noise and activity can cause extreme stress to a wildlife and can in fact kill it or compromise it to the point that we may not be able to save it.


PROVIDE A HEAT SOURCE

Important: Keep the wildlife warm A sock filled with rice and microwaved for approximately 30 seconds to a minute depending on your microwave can be provided a temporary heat source (Please make sure that the rice sock is not to hot and will not burn the wildlife in question.) OR using a heating pad set on low under half the container will provide heat as well.

Keeping the wildlife contained, quite and warm is essential. Baby wildlife can not regulate their own body temperature, so their system will start shutting down if they become cold.  Keeping the wildlife in quite area will prevent further shock and start the stabilizing process until a wildlife rehabilitator can get back to you. 


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